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Quality of Life Indicators

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Community Responsiveness to its Most Vulnerable Populations Data

The annual Reno Alliance for the Homeless count plus Washoe County School District count of students without shelter, basic food security and poverty measures, in conjunction with the resolution of local 2-1-1 issues indicate the community's response family difficulties.
Indicator Data:

SNAP -- updated 12/29/13
food security -- updated 12/28/13
populations living in poverty -- updated 12/29/13
children living in poverty -- updated 1230/13
developmental childhood services -- updated 1/31/13
Basic Family Budget Calculator -- updated 7/8/13
WIC (Woman, Infants & Children) -- updated 12/29/13
licensed childcare -- updated 12/8/13
homelessness -- updated 1/3/14
inter-religious organizations sponsoring community action/improvements
Nevada 2-1-1 system -- updated 1/4/14

SNAP -- updated 12/29/13


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The Federally funded Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program—SNAP (previous Food Stamp Program) helps low-income people buy needed food. SNAP assistance is based on the USDA Thrifty Food Plan, which is an estimate of how much it costs to buy food to prepare low-cost, nutritious meals for a household. SNAP benefits are typically only part of a household’s food budget and recipients need additional resources to buy sufficient food for a month. Self-sufficiency helps those in low-wage jobs, increases productivity, and supports nutrition for young children. Most of those eligible are either unemployed, working only part-time or working in low-paying jobs; already receive public assistance; are seniors with limited income or are disabled; or are homeless.

According to the 2011, Washoe County ACHIEVE community document, Access to Healthy Food in Washoe County: A Framework for Food System Design, although Nevada’s SNAP enrollment has increased, the state remains among the bottom 10 states in serving the population eligible for the food assistance program, and enrollment among eligible children (54%) is lower than the national average (61%). The Food Bank of Northern Nevada reported in their fall 2010 Food Source newsletter, that every $1 in SNAP benefits creates about $1.84 in economic activity used at local grocery stores. Nevadans already pay these federal taxes, but the money doesn’t come back to the state unless those eligible actually sign-up for benefits.

New York Times interactive map of food stamp usage across the county.

food security -- updated 12/28/13


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Food insecurity varies along a continuum as it becomes more severe, according to the Hunger in America 2006 National Report. The USDA developed a “scaling tool” to define and track food security and hunger among households, providing the following definitions:

Food security: Access by all people at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life. Food security includes at a minimum: (1) the ready availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods, and (2) an assured ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways (e.g., without resorting to emergency food supplies, scavenging, stealing, or other coping strategies).
Food insecurity: Limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods or limited or uncertain ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways.

Children from food insecure homes are more likely to have poorer overall and mental health, are sick and hospitalized more often, and miss more days of school. Older adults with inadequate diets are vulnerable to disease and require longer recovery from disease. This all of this adds up to increased costs for Nevadans. Assisting eligible families to receive federal earned income and child tax credits due to them is a first step to food security. In-school nutrition education is critical to our children’s futures. Training and employment programs, safe and affordable childcare, and alternate transportation options can help facilitate families transitioning to economic independence.

The Food Research and Action Center analyzes survey data collected as part of the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index project to calculate food hardship rates for states, including by Congressional District and the 100 largest MSA’s. The Nevada food hardship rate indicates the extent to which Nevadans are strug-gling with hunger.

According to America's Second Harvest (A2H) , a broad range of households in America receive some form of emergency food assistance:

  • 36.4% of the members of households served by the A2H National Network are children <18 years
  • 8% of the members of households are children age 0-5 years
  • 10% of the members of households are elderly
  • About 40% of clients are non-Hispanic white; 38% are non-Hispanic black, and the rest are from other racial groups (15% are Hispanic)
  • 36% of households include at least one employed adult
  • 68% have incomes below the official federal poverty level during the previous month
  • 12% are homeless
  • 93% are United States citizens

Among all client households served by emergency food programs of the A2H National Network:

  • 70% are estimated to be food insecure, according to the U.S. government’s official food security scale (this includes client households who are food insecure without hunger and those who are food insecure with hunger)
  • 33% of the clients are experiencing hunger
  • 42% of clients served by the A2H National Network report having to choose between paying for food and paying for utilities or heating fuel
  • 35% had to choose between paying for food and paying their rent or mortgage
  • 32% had to choose between paying for food and paying for medicine or medical care

The Food Bank of Northern Nevada estimated that 17% of the state’s populate in 2006 are food insecure; 37,595 individuals reside in Washoe County, 14,665 of whom are children. Note that the Food Bank’s service area includes 14 northern Nevada counties and portions of 7 eastern Sierra California counties; 63% of clients reside and 69% of food resources are distributed in Washoe County. In 2005, the Food Bank participated in the national study to better understand the realities of individuals seeking emergency food assistance. Key findings, include the following:

  • 61% of client households have incomes below the federal poverty threshold; 81% live below 130% of the threshold
  • 35% of clients have to choose between paying for food and paying for rent, utilities or medical care
  • 27% of clients never finished high school
  • The median monthly income of client households is $900
  • 37% of emergency food recipients are children < 18 years; 35% of clients who visit emergency food program sites are ≥ 65 years
  • 5.4% of clients households with children report that their children skipped meals due to a lack of food and money in the previous 12-months
  • Only 32% of client households receive food stamp benefits, although 81% are eligible (statewide, 44% of eligible households participate in the program)
  • In Nevada, more than $110 million in federal nutrition benefits are not being used each year due to low participation by potentially eligible families (food stamp eligibility begins at 130% of poverty)
  • Clients are 63% Caucasian, 21% Hispanic, and 8% African-American; 48% are children < 18 years and 13% are ≥ 60 years
  • 41% of clients not currently working have been unemployed for more than two years

populations living in poverty -- updated 12/29/13


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Other indicators show that these families face many difficulties including access to affordable medical insurance, affordable housing, and workforce skills. All of these factors combine to make it extremely difficult for families to alter their fortunes. The US poverty threshold for a family of four, two adults and two children, was $19,803 in 2004, and $21,756 in 2009, and $23,283 in 2012;  the poverty threshold for 1-person in 2012 was $11,720 ($10,830 in 2010);  < 65 years $11,945;  and ≥ 65 $11,011.

Powered by www.policymap.com, an online mapping tool and data warehouse.

 

children living in poverty -- updated 1230/13


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The Annie E. Casey, Kids Count project tracks the percentage of children living in poverty as one of the key indicators of child and family wellbeing. Kids Count poverty status is not determined for people in military barracks, institutional quarters, or for unrelated individuals under age 15 (such as foster children).  The data are based on income received in the 12 months prior to the survey.

Nevada ranked 18 for the share of families with related children under age 18 that have incomes below the federal poverty level at 18% in 2011;  Nevada ranked 32 in 2012. A family (2-adults and 2-children) in 2011 with an annual income below $22,811 were considered living in poverty, according to federal poverty threshold levels; in 2000, the figure was $17,463; in 2012, the figure was $23,283.

 

developmental childhood services -- updated 1/31/13


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Hungry children miss school and are less prepared to learn.

Basic Family Budget Calculator -- updated 7/8/13


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The Economic Policy Institute, Basic Family Budget Calculator calculates only the amounts a family needs to spend to feed, shelter and clothe, get to work and school, and subsist today. It only includes essentials, but no savings, no restaurant meals, no funds for emergencies.  The basic budget for a family of four in the Reno-Sparks MSA in 2004 was $38,100;  2007 increased to $40,440;  2013 increased to $67,794 (46% increase over 5-years)

The poverty threshold methodology doesn’t reflect recent rising costs for transportation, food, healthcare, etc., and underestimates real expenses for family necessities, costing more than double poverty guidelines. Note that 130% of poverty is eligibility threshold for nutrition programs, food stamps, free school lunch and USDA commodity programs.

Economic Policy Institute, Basic Family Budget Calculator

WIC (Woman, Infants & Children) -- updated 12/29/13


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Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally funded short-term nutrition program operated in Nevada through the Nevada State Health Division, Bureau of Family Health Services. Its objective is to improve the health of Nevada women, infants, and children who are eligible for the program by providing supplemental nutritious foods, nutrition education, and other health and social services. WIC is cost-effective. By reducing the incidence of low birth weight, premature births, and infant mortality, WIC generates significant savings in reduced health care costs. In fact, for every dollar spent on pregnant women in WIC, there is a $1.92 to $4.21 savings in Medicaid for newborns and their mothers. <a data-cke-saved-href="http://health.nv.gov/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=126&Itemid=215" href="http://health.nv.gov/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=126&Itemid=215" "="" title="Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Woman, Infants and Children">Nevada State Health Division, Bureau of Family Health Services

licensed childcare -- updated 12/8/13


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Washoe County provides Child Care Licensing Services. Few new homes and centers are licensed each year, a trend that is seen both statewide and nationally. This slow increase can be attributed, in part, to the rising employment rates and the disparate wage and benefit rates for child caregivers as a profession. The Department’s Child Care Service’s staff are geographically assigned to monitor the child care homes and centers that provide care to more than one child for compensation. Per NRS 432A, Washoe County Department of Social Services is authorized to enact and enforce regulations with regard to program and services of child care facilities. The Regulations for Child Care Facilities are approved by the Board of County Commissioners, as well as the Nevada Bureau of Services for Child Care.

The Department sponsors and partners with a number of community agencies to improve caregiver awareness and education in the areas of quality programming, child abuse and neglect prevention, reporting requirements, and caregiver support initiatives. The Children’s Cabinet reported in their 2009 Child Care in Nevada report that licensed care in Washoe County only meets 52.03% of the demand for children ages 0-5, decreasing to 27.26% for children ages 0-9. When combining licensed capacity and average daily attendance of school-age programs, only 30.82% of the demand for children ages 0-14 is met. Parents further reported to CCR&R that their main problem finding care is no available openings (or not open for requested schedule); 1,363 children were reported in self-care ages 6-9, and 2,930 children ages 10-12. The Children’s Cabinet also reported an excellent article (winter 2010) on the recession’s impact on child care and the economic reasons why it’s important to invest in child care, not only to increase the number of licensed providers, but due to the 1.67 multiplier impact on Nevada’s economy.

The Children's Cabinet also assists parents with affordable, accessible childcare to eligible parents who are working, going to school, in job training or seeking employment.

Ongoing challenges remain for families to find affordable childcare in their own neighborhoods or near their employment or that meet their work schedule. Supporting childcare is a smart business decision. For every $1 spent on childcare, there is at least a $2-$9 economic benefit through increased tax revenue and decreased social, education and health costs. [Source]

homelessness -- updated 1/3/14


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The Reno Area Alliance for the Homeless (RAAH) conducts an annual Point-in-Time count of homeless individuals across Reno, Sparks, and Washoe County. The effort includes a “street” count of the homeless, an online survey of homeless service providers, a motel count of individuals and families living at local motels, and interviews with homeless individuals living on the street, in motels, or in shelters. The Nevada Youth Empowerment Project (NYEP) conducts the annual Point-in-Time count survey of homeless youth.  Those interested in more specific data are encouraged to contact RAAH  or NYEP directly.

According to data collected by RAAH, the Washoe County School District, the Washoe County Sheriff’s Department, Kid’s Korner, and other service providers, approximately 16,000 households are considered at risk of becoming homeless in Washoe County alone. The most common factors of homelessness in northern Nevada are domestic crises (including domestic battering), inability to find an affordable house or apartment, unemployment, sudden illness in the family, and unforeseen major expenses. Some additional factors include the lack of adequate transportation preventing individuals from living in permanent housing, non-payment for child assistance, severe mental illness, chronic substance abuse, and victims of domestic violence.

According to Kelly Marschall, Principal at Social Entrepreneurs, Inc. who coordinated the January 2010, point-in-time count, provider survey and homeless interviews, "overwhelmingly, unemployment / lost job (60%) was the main reason listed for being homeless. In 2009 the greatest number of respondents (34%) indicated their employment was housing related (construction, real estate), prior to losing their job. In 2010, the number of those who became unemployed listed working in retail (25%) equal to those who indicated their previous employment was housing related (25%). Over half those interviewed (53%) indicated they currently worked full or part time but were unable to afford rent. 75% indicated they were actively seeking employment. Of those interviewed, 88% were living in Reno, Sparks and Washoe County when they became homeless with more than 50% indicating they have lived there more than 4 years. Nearly three-quarters (68%) of interviewees said that they can’t afford rent, have no job or income nor had the funds to provide a rental deposit plus first and last month’s rent. Thirty-four of the 70 (56%) respondents indicated they were on food stamps.  The greatest needs identified as unmet at this time included) permanent housing, 2) rental assistance, 3) transitional living or Section 8 vouchers."

The City of Reno's Police Department MOST (Mobile Safety Outreach Team) officers also pair with clinical social workers to take homeless to Reno's Record Street community Triage Center for detox and diagnosing mental illnesses, as an alternate approach to fighting crime.  The local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness donated money for an outreach van to transport those in need of treatment.

Family support services are available from local government social services agencies, the Assistance League of Northern Nevada, various shelters in the Reno/Sparks area, Kids Kottage and The Chidren’s Cabinet, as well as WCSD Family Resource Centers. For more information on homeless resources visit:  http://www.reno.gov/Index.aspx?page=788

inter-religious organizations sponsoring community action/improvements


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The Great Basin Peace and Justice Networkk lists the following members:

  • Alternative Transportation Club & EAA
  • Citizen Alert
  • Conscious Community and Business Network
  • International A.N.S.W.E.R, Reno
  • Great Basin Community Food Cooperative
  • HOME, Healing Ourselves and Mother Earth
  • No New Mushroom Clouds Over Nevada, or Anywhere Coalition
  • Reno AntiWar Coalition (RAWC)
  • Reno First United Methodist Church
  • Reno Free Store
  • Sierra Interfaith Action for Peace (SIAP)
  • Voices for Peace Youth Militarization Awareness Project (Y-Map)
  • Sierra Interfaith Action for Peace
  • Molly Ivins Pots ‘n’ Pans Brigade
  • Peace Crane Saturdays
  • Food Not Bombs Sundays

According to the Faith in Public Life website, the following faith organizations are focusing on specific community issues:

Nevada Presbytery - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Mainline Protestant
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Environment/Energy, Immigration
Web: http://www.nevadapres.org/

Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Roman Catholic
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Health/AIDS, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Senior Citizens’ Concerns, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://communitylink.reviewjournal.com/lvrj/ignore;jsessionid=f43%3A44dba6e8%3Aa11c686e4588312?MIval=framed_page&GID=00017000000959696568560409&PG=00017000000959696568655235

Catholic Community Services of Northern Nevada - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Roman Catholic
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Health/AIDS, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Senior Citizens’ Concerns, Children’s Issues/Education, Immigration
Web: http://ccsnn.org/

Citizen Alert - Las Vegas, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.citizenalert.org/

Episcopal Diocese of Nevada Peace and Justice Commission - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Mainline Protestant
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Peace/Human Rights, Labor/Just Wages, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Gay Rights/Sexuality, Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.nvdiocese.org/COMMITTEES-COMMISSIONS/PEACEJUSTICE/_PeaceJusticeDir.htm

FRIENDS OF NEVADA WILDERNESS - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.nevadawilderness.org/framesets/fmainset.htm

Family Promise Las Vegas - Las Vegas, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Senior Citizens’ Concerns, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://www.ihnlv.org/index.htm

First United Methodist Church, Carson City - Carson City, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Mainline Protestant
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness
Web: http://www.carson1umc.org/

Interfaith Council of Southern Nevada - Boulder City, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Peace/Human Rights, Fair Trade/International Development
Web: http://www.lasvegasinterfaith.org/

Las Vegas Catholic Worker - Las Vegas, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Roman Catholic
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Peace/Human Rights, Death Penalty/Criminal Justice/Drugs, Labor/Just Wages, Immigration
Web: http://communitylink.reviewjournal.com/servlet/lvrj_ProcServ/dbpage=page&mode=display&gid=01308001051025635176370394

Life, Peace, and Justice Commission of the Diocese of Reno - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Roman Catholic
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Peace/Human Rights, Death Penalty/Criminal Justice/Drugs, Labor/Just Wages, Reproductive Issues, Immigration
Web: http://www.catholicreno.org/

Metropolitan Community Church of Las Vegas - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Mainline Protestant
Policy Focus: Peace/Human Rights, Gay Rights/Sexuality
Web: http://www.mcclv.com/

Nevada ACORN - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Budget Reform/Taxes, Labor/Just Wages
Web: http://www.acorn.org

Nevada Desert Experience - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Peace/Human Rights
Web: http://www.nevadadesertexperience.org/index.htm

Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth - Las Vegas, NV
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Gay Rights/Sexuality
Web: http://www.nevadahomelessyouth.org/index.php

Nevada Shakespeare Co - Reno, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Peace/Human Rights, Gay Rights/Sexuality, Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.nevada-shakespeare.org/

Nevada Women's Lobby - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Children’s Issues/Education, Reproductive Issues
Web: http://www.nevadawomenslobby.org/

Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Immigration
Fax: (775) 348-7707
Web: http://www.planevada.org/

Religious Alliance in Nevada - Reno, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Ecumenical
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Death Penalty/Criminal Justice/Drugs, Health/AIDS, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence, Children’s Issues/Education, Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.rainnv.org/index.html

Reno AntiWar Coalition - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Peace/Human Rights, Fair Trade/International Development
Web: http://www.renopeace.org/index.htm

Sierra Interfaith Action for Peace - , NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Peace/Human Rights
Web: http://www.sierrainterfaith.org -

Southern Nevada Interfaith Council - Boulder City, NV
Faith Affiliation: Interfaith
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Peace/Human Rights, Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.pluralism.org/research/profiles/display.php?profile=73672

Sunrise Sustainable Resources Group - Minden, NV
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.solarquest.com/nevada/

Temple Emanu-El - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Jewish
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Peace/Human Rights, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://www.renoemanuel.org/

Temple Sinai - Reno, NV
Faith Affiliation: Jewish
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Women’s Health/Domestic Violence
Web: http://nv001.urj.net/

The Food Bank of Northern Nevada - Sparks, NV
Faith Affiliation: Secular
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://www.fbnn.org/

United Methodist Church, Nevada Regional Office - Reno, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Mainline Protestant
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Peace/Human Rights, Labor/Just Wages, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://www.cnumc.org/community/districtChurches/nevSierra.php

Victory Missionary Baptist Church - Las Vegas, NV - Show on Map
Faith Affiliation: Christian: Black Church
Policy Focus: Poverty/Hunger/Homelessness, Discrimination/Racial Issues, Health/AIDS, Senior Citizens’ Concerns, Children’s Issues/Education
Web: http://www.victorymbc.org/

Western Shoshone Defense Project - Crescent Valley, NV
Faith Affiliation: Other/Not Listed
Policy Focus: Discrimination/Racial Issues, Peace/Human Rights, Environment/Energy
Web: http://www.wsdp.org/

Nevada 2-1-1 system -- updated 1/4/14


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Nevada 2-1-1 is a health and human services help line that connects callers with essential services and referrals, which began taking calls in Nevada on February 13, 2006.  Since then, over a half a million callers have received help.  Nevada 2-1-1 at launch was available in only 39% of the state; now 2-1-1 has expanded throughout Nevada and is available to residents in 99.5% of the state.  With the support of more than 20 social service organizations that provide health and human services information and referrals, Nevada 2-1-1 provides an easy-to-remember telephone number that informs residents and impacts communities by connecting people with free information, important services and volunteer opportunities.  It’s a vital service that helps people find and give help, and assistance can be found online as well at www.nevada211.org.  Translation services in over 150 languages are available.  The mission of 2-1-1 is to provide Nevada citizens access to the following types of services:

  • Basic Human Services:  food banks, clothing closets, shelters, rent assistance, utility assistance.
  • Physical and Mental Health Resources:  health insurance programs, Medicaid and Medicare, maternal health, Children’s Health Insurance Program, medical information lines, crisis intervention services, support groups, counseling, drug and alcohol intervention and rehabilitation.
  • Employment Support Services:  financial assistance, job training, transportation assistance, education programs
  • Support for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities:  adult day care, congregate meals, Meals on Wheels, respite care, home health care, transportation, homemaker services.
  • Programs for Children, Youth and Families:  childcare, after school programs, Head Start, family resource centers, summer camps and recreation programs, mentoring, tutoring, protective services.
  • Volunteer Opportunities and Donations
  • Support for Community Crisis or Disaster Recovery:  2-1-1 systems in other states have proven valuable in disaster relief efforts in other communities. Nevada 2-1-1’s capabilities in this area will be developed as funding allows.

Nevada 2-1-1 System


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